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Thursday, 19 April 2018

Web Page No 2468

23rd April  2018
  First Picture: National Dried Milk
Second Picture:  My ration book
 Third Picture:  National Orange Juice




Forth Picture:   National Cod Liver Oil

Post War Memories

We must all remember having the distinctive tins of National Dried Milk around at home. This was full-cream milk that had been roller-dried into a powder and then artificially fortified with vitamin D. It was intended for feeding to children at a time when milk rationing was still in operation. It was also convenient for mothers.

At first, it was available only to children under 1 year of age; later 2 years. The National Dried Milk scheme had been announced by the autumn of 1940; by then, doctors and nutritionals were debating how it should best be served to infants and whether full-cream was indeed the best Product for them.

The storage and distribution of National Dried Milk across the country was contracted out to a company called SPD. You needed ration coupons to purchase it with and it could only be got at chemists. There was a proviso, though, which housewives learned to watch for: once the tin at the store was past the "Not for consumption after..." date, it could be sold off to anyone and was off the ration, providing a real windfall to the lucky average shopper. A half-cream version of the Dried Milk was introduced in 1941 but it is the full fat version that is mostly remembered.
Well after the war, National Dried Milk was still being sold right through until mid-1965, though by that point, it only accounted for 12 percent of milk sales. People on welfare could purchase it at subsidized prices, but there was a limit to how much you could buy at these prices. Everyone else could buy unlimited quantities at regular prices.

In the mid-1960s, a 1 lb. (450g) tin sold for 4/-, or 2/4 at the subsidized price. National Dried Milk was finally discontinued in 1976, when there was no longer any point, as people were opting to purchase the special infant formulas that had started to flood the market instead.

Many people in their Second World War, and post war, memoirs confuse National Dried Milk with "Household Milk" which was a dried skimmed milk for general consumption; National Dried Milk was dried "full cream" milk aimed at feeding infants like you and me.

One unforeseen benefit was that after the tin was emptied it was very handy for storing nuts, bolts, screws and washers. Every shed or garage had at least three of these on the shelf. However, one very surprising use was developed by my father in law. In the early 1950s they lived in Newcastle upon Tyne and in the greenhouse attached to the house he nurtured a superb grape vine with sweet black grapes on it. Come the picking season he would harvest bunches of grapes, wrap them up carefully and place them in a Dried Milk tin. This he would seal and wrap and post off to his mother in Ringwood and apparently, they always arrived in prime condition.

All children under five were allocated cod liver oil; those under three got daily milk (fluid or full-cream dried) and orange juice as well. Our mothers would collect the bottles of cod liver oil and concentrated orange juice, both of which were provided by America, at the local clinic or "Welfare Centres" that were especially set up to monitor public health. I remember that the orange juice was sticky but tasted wonderful but the cod-liver oil was absolutely disgusting. No matter how much I complained my mother made sure that I took it.

Clearly the refusal to take cod-liver oil was widespread, as it soon became available as 'cod liver oil and malt', this became a totally acceptable brown sticky substance that tasted like toffee and had to be spooned out of a large jar, this was a totally different matter and made the medicine popular and once we were at school, there was free milk, but I have spoken of this before.

To obtain all these essential ‘goodies’ mother had to present my ration book which can be seen at the top of the page.
Just one other thing that comes to mind is that my mother, being an ex-nurse, insisted on me swallowing a large spoon of ‘opening medicine’ to keep me ‘regular’ every Saturday morning. Yuck!!!!!
Keep in touch

Yours

Peter

gsseditor@gmail.com
Mary Writes:

I admit it, I love Jelly Babies,  Sugared Almonds, Pontefract Cakes and Turkish Delight. Rarely do I indulge myself but the memories live on! I remember taking huge containers of Bassetts Allsorts to Australia where my sister in law craved them. She said that they don`t taste the same in Australia. Lots of lovely things there but nothing like British sweets.  Last night as I was about to switch off the TV I saw the sixties pop star Jess Conrad on a programme about older stars in Las Vegas. He is still a nice looking man but there he was struggling to open a cereal pkt. He said his wife did everything for him and how he misses her. I found that very sad, especially when I remembered seeing him at the Guildhall in Portsmouth. 




On this day 23rd April 1960-1965.

On 23/04/1960 the number one single was My Old Man's a Dustman - Lonnie Donegan and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top-rated TV show was Wagon Train (ITV) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.The big news story of the week was 1500 killed in Iranian earthquake.

On 23/04/1961 the number one single was Wooden Heart - Elvis Presley and the number one album was GI Blues - Elvis Presley. The top-rated TV show was Bootsie & Snudge (Granada) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmatians. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 23/04/1962 the number one single was Wonderful Land - The Shadows and the number one album was Blue Hawaii - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Lawrence of Arabia. A pound of today's money was worth £12.89 and Ipswich Town were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 23/04/1963 the number one single was How Do You Do It? - Gerry & the Pacemakers and the number one album was Summer Holiday - Cliff Richard & the Shadows. The top-rated TV show was Labour Party-Political Broadcast (all channels) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 23/04/1964 the number one single was A World Without Love - Peter & Gordon and the number one album was With the Beatles - The Beatles. The top-rated TV show was Liberal Party Political Broadcast (all channels) and the box office smash was Dr Strangelove. A pound of today's money was worth £12.24 and Liverpool were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the week was the head of Denmark's Little Mermaid was stolen.

On 23/04/1965 the number one single was Ticket to Ride - The Beatles and the number one album was Rolling Stones Number 2 - The Rolling Stones. The top-rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.




Wednesday, 11 April 2018

Web Page No 2466

16th April  2018

First Picture: Jelly Babies Packet
 Second Picture:  Tom Baker and Jelly Babies

 Third Picture:  Beatles Babies
Forth Picture:   Jellyatrics



Fifth Picture:   Bassetts advert 1926

Jelly Babies
'Jelly Babies' are known to have been on sale since the Riches Confectionery Company of 22 Duke St, London Bridge in 1885 introduced them along with a variety of other baby-sweets including 'Tiny Totties' and 'Sloper's Babies'. But the pricing of these at a farthing each suggests that they were very much larger than the modern Jelly Baby.
Sweets called "unclaimed babies", which may pre-date Jelly babies, are known to have been produced by Thomas Fryer of Nelson in Lancashire, and seem to have been hugely popular in the early 20th Century. In 1939 it was reported that, of all the comforts sent to troops abroad, "the sweets which are in greatest demand are those which we all know as 'unclaimed babies'".
An uncorroborated, but widely reproduced, story is related in The History of Temptation by Tim Richardson  published in 2002. Here he states that the sweets were invented in 1864 by an Austrian immigrant working at Fryers of Lancashire and that in 1918 they were produced by Bassett's in Sheffield as "Peace Babies" to mark the end of World War I. Production was suspended during World War II due to wartime shortages. In 1953 the product was relaunched as "Jelly Babies".
The most noted modern manufacturer of Jelly Babies, Bassett's, now allocate individual name, shape, colour and flavour to different 'babies': Brilliant (red - strawberry), Bubbles (yellow - lemon), Baby Bonny (pink - raspberry), Boofuls (green - lime), Bigheart (purple - blackcurrant) and Bumper (orange). The introduction of different shapes and names was an innovation, circa 1989, prior to which all colours of jelly baby were a uniform shape. In 2007, Bassett's jelly babies changed to include only natural colours and ingredients.
There are many brands of jelly babies, as well as supermarket own brands. A line of sweets called Jellyatrics were launched by Barnack Confectionery Ltd to commemorate the Jelly Baby's 80th birthday.
Like most other gummi sweets, they contain gelatin. Jelly babies manufactured in the United Kingdom tend to be dusted in starch which is left over from the manufacturing process where it is used to aid release from the mould. Jelly babies of Australian manufacture generally lack this coating.
Jelly babies are similar in appearance to gummi bears, which are better known outside the United Kingdom, though the texture is different.
A popular science class experiment is to put them in a strong oxidising agent and see the resulting spectacular reaction. The experiment is commonly referred to as "screaming jelly babies".
In 1962, Jelly Babies were referred to as "those kids' candies" in a Supercar episode;"Operation Superstork". When Beatlemania broke out in 1963, fans of The Beatles pelted the band with jelly babies (or, in the US, the much harder jelly beans) after it was reported that George Harrison liked eating them.
In the British television programme Doctor Who, jelly babies were often mentioned in the classic series as a confection The Doctor favoured. First seen being consumed by the Second Doctor, they became most associated with Tom Baker's Fourth Doctor, who had a predilection for offering them to strangers in order to defuse tense situations (and in one episode bluffing another alien into thinking them a weapon).
The FifthSixthSeventhEighthEleventh, and Twelfth Doctors also offered them up in different episodes. The Doctor's nemesis the Master in "The Sound of Drums" offers them to his wife on board the Valiant. In the series, they were often identified simply by the fact the Doctor (and later the Master) usually carried them around in a simple white paper bag. The Twelfth Doctor, however, once carried his in a cigarette case.
In Terry Pratchett's Discworld Series, the country of Djelibeybi (meaning 'Child of the [River] Djel') is the Discworld's analogue of Ancient Egypt. The main setting of Pyramids, the country is about two miles wide along the length of the Djel, serves as a buffer zone between Tsort and Ephebe and is in dire financial straits due to the construction of its many pyramids. The name 'Djelibeybi' is a pun of the name 'jelly baby'.
In May 2013 Australian singer Alison Hams released "Jelly Baby Song"[ - its content alluding to the consumption of jelly babies by type 1 diabetics to overcome hypoglycaemic episodes - as a way to raise awareness for type 1 diabetes for JDRF Australia (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) who sell especially-packaged jelly babies as the focus of their annual "Jelly Baby Month" campaign.
In 2009, a poll of 4,000 British adults voted jelly babies their 6th favourite sweet.
And you thought that they were just a packet of sweets.
Keep in touch

Yours

Peter

gsseditor@gmail.com

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On this day 16th  April 1960-1965.
On 16/04/1960 the number one single was My Old Man's a Dustman - Lonnie Donegan and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Wagon Train (ITV) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 16/04/1961 the number one single was Wooden Heart - Elvis Presley and the number one album was GI Blues - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was The Budget (All Channels) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmations. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Bay of Pigs landings in Cuba.

On 16/04/1962 the number one single was Wonderful Land - The Shadows and the number one album was Blue Hawaii - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Lawrence of Arabia. A pound of today's money was worth £12.89 and Ipswich Town were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 16/04/1963 the number one single was How Do You Do It? - Gerry & the Pacemakers and the number one album was Summer Holiday - Cliff Richard & the Shadows. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 16/04/1964 the number one single was Can't Buy Me Love - The Beatles and the number one album was With the Beatles - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was The Budget (All Channels) and the box office smash was Dr Strangelove. A pound of today's money was worth £12.24 and Liverpool were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Shea Stadium opens in New York.

On 16/04/1965 the number one single was The Minute You're Gone - Cliff Richard and the number one album was Freewheelin' Bob Dylan. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.








Thursday, 5 April 2018


Web Page No 2464

9th April  2018

First Picture: Raymond Baxter Fighter pilot

 Second Picture: Raymond Baxter Motor Racer



Third Picture:   Raymond Baxter OBE 


Raymond Baxter
It seemed for a time in the 1960s that every time we turned on the television there was Raymond Baxter with his extrovert polish and buoyant optimism, in fact he did possibly more than any other broadcaster to popularise science and bring new British inventions into the public eye. In 1965, he became the first presenter of TV's Tomorrow's World. He broadcast from Concorde, in its early stages; he introduced the pocket calculator, microwave, and the barcode- and also less likely hopefuls such as a wheelbarrow designed with a ball instead of a wheel. He remained at Tomorrow's World, which attracted audiences of up to 10 million, until, in 1977, when a new editor, Michael Blakstad, ushered in an era of more "investigative" reporting.
Glyn Jones, the first editor of Tomorrow's World, had given Raymond Baxter the job because of his outside broadcast experience and a capacity to deal with the unexpected, was rare in live studio broadcasting. Colleagues found him the archetypal, unruffled frontman, brilliant at delivering words written by others, although they were not so praising about his editorial judgment. A further complication was that Glynn Jones had come from the Daily Mirror, which was far from being the newspaper Raymond Baxter most favoured. However, with the onset of Michael Blakstad’s regime, Raymond, at 55, had allegedly become a "dinosaur", who vulgarised science by talking about it in a tone that suggested - to one newspaper critic - that he was addressing half-witted foreigners.
His background suggested little formal connection with science, except that his father was a science teacher. His schooldays at Ilford County High school ended early when the second world war broke out. He became a qualified Spitfire pilot by the time he was 18 and served with 65, 93, and 602 squadrons in Britain and abroad, instructed fighter pilots, and made dive bomber raids on German V2 rocket bases in the last year of the war.
After the war, he auditioned for British Forces Broadcasting in Cairo, and returned to Britain a year later in an attempt to join the BBC, but was referred back to Forces radio for more training. This he did in Germany, finally becoming civilian deputy director of the then British Forces Network. Facilities in Germany were basic and he had to be a jack-of-all-trades. But when he had another crack at the BBC two years later, he was a master of his craft. At least, he thought so, though the BBC insisted he got regional experience as well in Bristol.
He loved motor racing, and competed in the Monte Carlo, the Alpine, Tulip and RAC rallies; he also took part, as a crew member, in the New Zealand Air Race of 1953. As an outside broadcasts reporter, he was a natural to cover air shows and boat races, while his manner also made him suitable for state funerals and the 1953 coronation.
He staked his claim as a science populariser in 1958 with a television series called ‘Eye On Research’. It showed the possibilities, and some said, the limitations, of using a keen-eyed and enthusiastic layman to present complicated science. Three years after the launch of Tomorrow's World he left the BBC staff to go freelance - though continuing with the programme - so that he could become director of motoring publicity for the ailing British Motor Corporation. He was not a natural company man and the arrangement lasted only a year.
A few months before his departure from Tomorrow's World, the gardener on his estate at Denham, Buckinghamshire, took him to an industrial tribunal amid much publicity after being sacked for incompetence. Raymond Baxter won the case, but not without cost: he uncharacteristically broke down in tears during the hearing. A year later he sold the estate a moved to Henley.
His own departure from the BBC had, he admitted, also been bitter. He did not include Tomorrow's World in his Who's Who entry, except for the mention of the books he wrote on it with James Burke and Michael Latham. However, he carried on working occasionally for the BBC, covering the Farnborough Air Show many times, and was heard in the BBC's programmes in commemoration of D-Day.
He sailed a lot and enjoyed his honours, including an OBE awarded in 2003 and being made a freeman of the City of London.
Raymond Frederic Baxter was born on 25th January 1922 and died on 15th September 2006 at the age of 84. His American wife, Sylvia, whom he married in 1945, died in 1996. Their children, Graham and Jenny, survive him.

Keep in touch

Yours

Peter

gsseditor@gmail.com

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On this day 9th  April 1960-1965.
On 09/04/1960 the number one single was My Old Man's a Dustman - Lonnie Donegan and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was The Budget (All Channels) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 09/04/1961 the number one single was Wooden Heart - Elvis Presley and the number one album was GI Blues - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was Labour Party Political Broadcast (all channels) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmatians. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 09/04/1962 the number one single was Wonderful Land - The Shadows and the number one album was Blue Hawaii - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was The Budget (All Channels) and the box office smash was Lawrence of Arabia. A pound of today's money was worth £12.89 and Ipswich Town were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Film director Michael Curtiz and ex Beatle Stu Sutcliffe die.

On 09/04/1963 the number one single was Summer Holiday - Cliff Richard & the Shadows and the number one album was Summer Holiday - Cliff Richard & the Shadows. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Atomic US submarine sinks killing 129.


On 09/04/1964 the number one single was Can't Buy Me Love - The Beatles and the number one album was With the Beatles - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was Labour Party Political Broadcast (all channels) and the box office smash was Dr Strangelove. A pound of today's money was worth £12.24 and Liverpool were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Beatles have 13 records in US chart.

On 09/04/1965 the number one single was Concrete & Clay - Unit 4 Plus 2 and the number one album was Rolling Stones Number 2 - The Rolling Stones. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.




Thursday, 29 March 2018

Web Page No 2462

2nd April  2018

First Picture: Washing Day
 Second Picture:  Kitchen Cabinets

 Third Picture:  Gas Iron



Forth Picture: Everything was plugged into the light socket !!!!!

When a woman's week revolved around the washing

A remarkable book has shown how very different things were for housewives in the Fifties, once married, women could expect to spend up to 15 hours a day on their household chores . . .
One lady, when her first child arrived in 1952, resigned from her job and turned to the task of caring for her husband, her home and her family. 
For the next 15 years, she shopped, cooked, cleaned, mended, scrubbed, laundered and baby-minded. She spent much of her life clad in an apron — scraping carrots, scouring a frying pan or rubbing her way through a mighty pile of dirty washing. Or she’s pegging out nappies or darning a frayed sleeve. In all these activities, my mother was absolutely typical of a generation for whom marriage and home were the twin pinnacles of aspiration.
Yet, today, a journey into the Fifties  can seem like alighting on another planet.
What was it really like? For most married women, the dramas of their everyday lives were played out beside the washing line, around the stove or at the kitchen sink. They had few hours to call their own. In 1951, for instance, a Mass Observation survey revealed that housewives in the London suburbs were spending an incredible 15 hours a day on domestic activities. Perhaps that figure isn’t quite so surprising when you learn that, by the start of the decade, only around 4% of British households owned a washing machine. Just 16 % owned some form of electric water heater. A quarter of homes were still cooking on coal ranges.
Many households still relied on much of the same basic equipment and materials that their parents and grandparents had used. Everyone knew that homes had to be spring-cleaned, rooms regularly ‘turned out’, carpets beaten, paintwork and curtains washed — just as they’d always been. There was only one person to do the lot, while also looking after the children, making all the meals and making sure that everything was ironed — right down to the baby’s dresses and pram sheets. No wonder the housewife’s familiar lament was that her work never seemed to get done.
In desperation, many turned to magazines for guidance that set out the average housewife’s day with the precision of a railway timetable.
‘She will rise at 7.15,’ it commands. ‘Breakfast is a rolling meal. She and her husband will eat theirs first, before he leaves for work at 8.15, at which time the children come on stream.
‘Once fed, they are packed off to school at quarter to nine. Then the real work begins: turning down beds and opening windows, washing up, dusting and tidying, followed by “weekly work”.
And what might that weekly work be? The Housewives’ Pocket Book has all the rigid answers:
Monday: Laundry.
Tuesday: Clean out bedroom and landing. Ironing in evening.
Wednesday: Clean out children’s bedroom and do stairs. Mending in evening.
Thursday: Clean out hall, bathroom, WC, cooking stove.
Friday: Clean out living rooms ready for weekend; baking for weekend, cleaning silver.
Saturday: Weekend shopping; change all linen, towels etc.
Once the housewife has done her allotted weekly tasks, she’s permitted a short rest at 11am, when she may put her feet up. Then she must go shopping, after which she can have lunch, followed by a 45-minute ‘personal recreation’ period. Tea must be on the table by 4.15pm. After tea, she must ‘tidy herself’, and prepare the evening meal, which will be served at 6.30pm. The children should be packed off to bed at 7.30pm. Then, unless the housewife needs to catch up on ironing and mending, she can more or less relax with her husband until bedtime.
It may seem extraordinary now that anyone felt they should follow these rules to the letter. But the evidence is that many women took them extremely seriously. It was a matter of pride for the self-respecting housewife to have her whites blowing on the line where everyone could see them by Monday lunchtime. 
One housewife wrote in her diary about her embarrassment one Saturday, when her daughter-in-law insisted on doing the washing on a Saturday night. What on earth would the neighbours think when they saw it hanging on the line? Early on Sunday morning, she crept down to the garden in dressing gown and slippers to unpeg the offending articles before anyone could notice them.
Washing, drying and ironing dominated women’s lives. Blankets, sheets, curtains and clothes were all hand-washed, using water boiled up in a vast copper, then rinsed and put through an unwieldy wrought-iron mangle. Cleanliness was next to godliness —and that extended to the net curtains.
Even after all the jobs were done, Fifties magazines — such as Good Housekeeping — were spurring the homemaker to do more. Here she’d learn that her sinks should be disinfected and her dishcloths regularly boiled. Her cupboards should be full of home-made jam, jellies and bottled beans, and her children’s nutritious packed lunches made the night before.
Did women find this truly fulfilling? Maybe some did, but plenty look back on their endless tasks with something akin to horror. One housewife spoke for millions when she wrote this diary entry on June 26, 1950: ‘I have washed. And being a good drying day, also ironed; been to the library, bought rations, typed a letter, had two cups tea, and here I am . . .Housework is endless.
Food shopping, as The Housewives’ Pocket Book said needed to be done daily. Most people didn’t have fridges, so food that lingered too long in the pantry led to many outbreaks of food poisoning in the summer. In 1951, a Mass Observation survey revealed that the average housewife spent 57 minutes a day shopping for necessities.
Grocery stores weighed goods individually. Cheese was sliced off the block with a wire, and butter was moulded with wooden paddles into half-pound rounds. At the butcher’s, entire carcases hung from hooks, while pigs’ heads stared balefully from behind the counter. You chose the cut you wanted and, if the price was too high when the butcher weighed it, you had it cut down to the size. Chicken was a luxury, but every housewife knew the difference between a boiling fowl and one to roast. Cabbage, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts were preferred to spinach or pumpkins, which were rarely available. Avocados and fruit-flavoured yogurt were unknown
From the moment commercial television arrived in 1955, people on buses could be heard humming the advertising jingles. Suddenly, everything seemed to be changing fast. The High Street shops was being threatened by self-service supermarkets. By 1958, these already had a 17 % share of the grocery market.
Why soak porridge oats overnight when you could buy cornflakes, or Ready Brek? Why make a sponge cake from scratch when you could concoct ‘the perfect sponge in 12 minutes with Green’s Sponge Mixture.’ For an easy evening meal, there was Birds Eye Quick-frozen Chicken Pie followed by Lyons Ready-Mix Suet Puddings.
There could be little doubt that the life of the housewife was being transformed — at least in some ways.

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Peter

gsseditor@gmail.com

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ON THIS DAY 2nd April 1960-1965



On 02/02/1960 the number one single was My Old Man's a Dustman - Lonnie Donegan and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was The Budget (All Channels) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Budget increases price of cigarettes by 2d a pack.

On 02/02/1961 the number one single was Wooden Heart - Elvis Presley and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was No Hiding Place (AR) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmations. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 02/02/1962 the number one single was Wonderful Land - The Shadows and the number one album was Blue Hawaii - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Lawrence of Arabia. A pound of today's money was worth £12.89 and Ipswich Town were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was James Hanratty hanged for A6 murder.

On 02/02/1963 the number one single was Summer Holiday - Cliff Richard & the Shadows and the number one album was Summer Holiday - Cliff Richard & the Shadows. The top rated TV show was The Budget (All Channels) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 02/02/1964 the number one single was Can't Buy Me Love - The Beatles and the number one album was With the Beatles - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Dr Strangelove. A pound of today's money was worth £12.24 and Liverpool were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Video recorder first demonstrated.

On 02/02/1965 the number one single was The Last Time - Rolling Stones and the number one album was Rolling Stones Number 2 - The Rolling Stones. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.