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Thursday, 20 July 2017

Web Page  No 2390

22nd July 2017

First Picture: The Church of Marilyn Munroe
 Second Picture: Tommy

 Third Picture: Fire
Fourth Picture: The Restored Pier




TOMMY A ROCK OPERA, THE WHO.

I know that some of our number were extras in the filming of Tommy and they have their own tales to tell of the experience. Must of us know that it was the filming that caused the fire on South Parade Pier, but there were several other local venues used during the filming. Some may surprise you. 

Read on:-
During the summer of 1974 a lot of scenes from the film Tommy were filmed in and around the Portsmouth area, with many local people appearing in the film as extras. The director, Ken Russell, had used the area previously, filming scenes for The Boyfriend in 1971 starring Twiggy and Christopher Gable, at the New Theatre Royal in Guildhall Walk.

Some of the locations used:- Hilsea Lido swimming pool was used to portray Bernie’s Holiday Camp swimming pool

Whilst the Church of Marilyn Monroe was actually St. Andrew's Church in Henderson Road, Eastney. This church was built to serve the Royal Marines Eastney barracks and was dedicated at a service on 17th  November 1905 by the Lord Bishop of Winchester, it was built to the design known as 'Admiralty Pattern Churches'. Following the closure of Eastney Barracks in 1991 this building has now been redeveloped into private housing. I'm sure the present residents realise the buildings religious background, but I wonder if they have seen the scenes in the film when Tommy is taken to the church by his mother Ann-Margret to be cured and where the congregation take part in a communion consuming both drugs and alcohol?  I would think not!

The King's Theatre in Albert Road is where the scene when Tommy battles against Elton John, wearing a massively high pair of Doc Marten boots, for supremacy as the Pinball Wizard,  was filmed.Tommy of course won the competition. The boots modelled on the classic cherry red, Doc Marten, were 4ft 6½ inches high and constructed from glass fibre. Elton John kept the boots after filming as this was one of the conditions he laid down to appear in the film. He later sold them at one of his famous auctions in 1988, they were bought by a director of R Griggs, the makers of Dr. Martens. 


Two of the most unlikely locations for filming were in Fort Purbrook on Portsdown Hill when it was made up to look like Tommy’s Holiday Camp, it was also used for other scenes and Pounds Scrapyard. The history of the forts is well documented so here is a short history of Harry Pounds Yard. The scrapyard at Tipner was opened just after the 2nd World War and is where much of the discarded military equipment from Portsmouth Dockyard ended up. It is now mostly empty although some items can still be see them from the M27 motorway. The scene filmed here was the climax to the film, scrap maritime marker buoys were spray painted silver to depict giant pinballs, Tommy navigates his way through a surreal scene of giant pinballs and collections of burning pinball machines, after his followers riot and destroy the holiday camp.


However the most famous location was when South Parade Pier was used to represent Bernie’s Holiday Camp Ballroom. As we all know fire broke out during filming when Ann-Margret and Oliver Reed, Tommy's mother and stepfather were dancing in the Gaiety Show Bar, disguised as the ballroom of the Holiday Camp. The fire resulted in serious damage to the pier estimated to be £500,000. Ken Russell's crew continued filming whilst the fire was being fought by the fire services and the fire scenes were used in other sections of the film notably the destruction of Bernies Holiday camp.

The cast list of ‘Tommy’ makes interesting reading. 

• Roger Daltrey as Tommy Walker
• Ann-Margret as Nora Walker
• Oliver Reed as Frank Hobbs (Uncle Frank)
• Tina Turner as The Acid Queen
• Elton John as The Pinball Wizard
• Eric Clapton as The Preacher
• Keith Moon as Uncle Ernie/Himself
• Paul Nicholas as Cousin Kevin
• Jack Nicholson as The Specialist
• Robert Powell as Group Captain Walker
• Pete Townshend as Himself
• John Entwistle as Himself
• Arthur Brown as The Priest
• Victoria Russell as Sally Simpson
• Ben Aris as Reverend Arthur Simpson
• Mary Holland as Mrs. Simpson
• Gary Rich as Rock Musician
• Dick Allan as President Black Angels
• Barry Winch as Young Tommy
• Eddie Stacey as Bovver boy
• Ken Russell (uncredited) as Cripple 


Keep in touch

Peter


On this day 22nd July 1960-1965
On 22/07/1960 the number one single was Good Timin' - Jimmy Jones and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Rawhide (ITV) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.


On 22/07/1961 the number one single was Temptation - Everly Brothers and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was No Hiding Place (AR) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmations. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 22/07/1963 the number one single was Confessin' - Frank Ifield and the number one album was Please Please Me - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 22/07/1964 the number one single was A Hard Day's Night - Beatles and the number one album was Rolling Stones - The Rolling Stones. The top rated TV show was Conservative Party Political Broadcast (all channels) and the box office smash was Dr Strangelove. A pound of today's money was worth £12.24 and Liverpool were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Postal strike ends.

On 22/07/1965 the number one single was Mr Tambourine Man - Byrds and the number one album was The Sound of Music Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions










Thursday, 13 July 2017

Web Page  No 2388

15th July 2017


First Picture: Pre War Golly
 Second Picture: Ali Jam Jar

 Third Picture: Special Naval edition

Fourth Picture: Golly Watch





Box Tops and Badges

Looking back a lot of our childhood involved collecting things and sending off for items. How many of you collected the plastic bandsmen in the cornflake packets or the plastic trains inside the tubes of toilet rolls? I-Spy badges and feathers and all sorts of things. Most of us I guess.

We all collected the paper golly’s off of Robertson’s Jam and marmalade and then sent them off to swap them for metal pin on badges and there seemed to be an endless variety of them to collect. So, let us look at the history and demise of the Robertson’s Golly.

The origin of Golly is shrouded in mystery and has been accredited to several different sources. Golly is probably best known in England, appearing during the 1920s in the form of pin badges as the advertising logo for the Robertson's Jam and preserves company.  The badges became so popular that other items of Golly advertising merchandise became available and each year bought more and more new items to add to your collection.  

It is a little-known fact that the Robertson's badges and memorabilia became a great strain on the company as nearly all monies raised from sales were donated to the various charities that the Robertson's Company supported.  These charities included Cancer Research, Cystic Fibrosis, The Royal National Lifeboat Institution, Leukaemia Research and the 2001 Children in need Appeal.

Robertsons were way ahead of their time when they decided to use the Golly badges and merchandise to support several other worthwhile causes, these included the Viota Scheme (promoting healthy eating and baking) their own brand of organic mincemeat, road safety (the green cross code) promoting recycling with the Ali Jamja badge and there was even a badge commissioned for HMS Critchton to thank the sailors for their efforts protecting the nation. 

When it came to world events Robertsons were no back number here either, creating badges to commemorate the likes of many historical events from 1910 to 1990, The Barcelona Olympics 1992, The World Cup 1998,  Euro 2000, and even a special Millenium badge.

Eventually though Golly suffered the fate of the PC brigade as the continual habit of crediting Golly to the word "Golliwog" finally saw him off.  This is almost incomprehensible to fathom as anybody who takes the time to examine the history and paperwork of the Golly sensation will soon realise that even as far back as 1920s the word "Golliwog" was not used, Robertsons simply referred to their beloved iconic logo as just Golly.
It is believed that Robertsons were so taken aback that anybody could even think their company brand stood for racist views that they didn’t even attempt to defend themselves and instead chose to retire Golly even though several surveys supported the view that Robertsons should ignore the dissenters and continue to use their Golly logo.

So one of the greatest ever supporters of charities who stood for healthy eating, recycling, our children's safety whilst promoting sport and fitness, was finally seen off because his face was the wrong colour and people continually mispronounced his name as Golliwog.
Golly was as much a victim of racism as any other, he was a large part of most children's childhood and stood for no more than jam and the fun of collecting his many friends and bright coloured collectables, as such he should have been recognised as the pride of his era!
In 1999 a Robertson spokesperson said, "He's still very popular. Each year we get more than 340,000 requests for Golly badges. Since 1910 we have sent out more than 20 million." Serious Robertson's collectors may have thousands of Golly badges in their collections. Nevertheless, Robertson's Golly badges still remain highly collectable, with the very rarest sometimes selling for more than £1,000, and even comparatively common and recent badges being worth £2.00–£3.00.

Other Robertson's Golly memorabilia include such things as clocks, watches, tableware, porcelain figurines, jewellery, aprons, knitting patterns, playing cards, dolls, children's silverware sets, pencils, erasers and, of course, the Golly tokens themselves.

Robertson pendant chains were introduced in 1956, and, soon after, the design of all Robertson Gollies changed from the Old Golly with pop eyes to the present Golly with eyes looking to the left. The words "Golden Shred" were removed from his waistcoat, his eyes were straightened, and his smile was broadened.

How well I remember Golly!

Keep in touch
Peter


On this day 15th  July 1960-1965

On 15/07/1960 the number one single was Good Timin' - Jimmy Jones and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Rawhide (ITV) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 15/07/1961 the number one single was Runaway - Del Shannon and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Harpers West One (ATV) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmations. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 15/07/1962 the number one single was I Can't Stop Loving You - Ray Charles and the number one album was West Side Story Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Lawrence of Arabia.

On 15/07/1963 the number one single was I Like It - Gerry & the Pacemakers and the number one album was Please Please Me - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the week was UK Ministry of Defence proposed to replace War Office.

15/07/1964 the number one single was It's All Over Now - Rolling Stones and the number one album was Rolling Stones - The Rolling Stones. The top rated TV show was Labour Party Political Broadcast (all channels) and the box office smash was Dr Strangelove. A pound of today's money was worth £12.24 and Liverpool were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 15/07/1965 the number one single was Crying in the Chapel - Elvis Presley and the number one album was The Sound of Music Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the week was Mont Blanc Tunnel officially opened.


















Wednesday, 5 July 2017

Web Page  No 2386

8th July 2017


First Picture: Wrap Round Apron
 Second Picture: One bar electric fire.

Third Picture: Early Washing Machine
 Fourth Picture: Was it really like this?




Had this sent to me recently, was this your Mum?


The 1950s Housewife

The life of the average married woman in the 1950s was very different from that of today’s woman. This was the age of respectability and conformity. Very few women worked after getting married; they stayed at home to raise the chil-dren and keep house. The man was considered the head of the household in all things; mortgages, legal documents and bank accounts. Only the family allow-ance was paid directly to the mother. Should a woman find herself in a loveless or violent marriage, she was trapped; she had no money of her own and no ca-reer.

It was still unusual for women to go to university, especially working class women. Most left school and went straight into work until they married. Sec-ondary schools - even grammar schools - prepared girls for this life: lessons were given in cookery, household management, darning, sewing and even how to iron a shirt properly. Girls were trained to look after their husband, their children and the house.

The house itself was very different from that of today. There was no central heating; the downstairs rooms were heated by coal fires and then later, after the Clean Air Acts of 1956 and 1968, by coke or gas fires. Upstairs the heating was provided by paraffin stoves and electric fires. During the winter night-time routine was hot water bottles in the beds and undressing downstairs in the warm.  Thick dressing gowns and slippers were essentials. Every home had a coal bunker from where the coal was taken by coal scuttle into the house.

In the kitchen, fridges were becoming more common although freezers were unheard of. It wasn’t until the early 1960s that local shops started stocking fro-zen foods such as frozen peas and fish fingers. These were purchased and cooked straight away as most people could not store them. Many people had only the pantry with its cold shelf, where butter, milk, cheese etc. was stored. 
Shopping for food in the 1950s was done every day as storing fresh food was difficult. The housewife would visit the baker, the butcher, the greengrocer and the grocer individually, carrying all her shopping home in a basket. She would pride herself on budgeting and keeping within the weekly allowance that she would receive from her husband. 

Monday was washing day in most households. If you were lucky enough to have a washing machine, it would be a twin-tub with mangle on top. This had to be filled from the tap. After the clothes had washed they were lifted out of the hot water with large wooden tongs, fed through the mangle the whole kitchen would fill with steam as first the whites were washed and then the col-oured clothes as the water cooled. In the winter or when it rained, clothes were hung on clothes horses or airers around the fire or in the kitchen where it was warm. On other days clothes were pegged out to dry on clothes lines with wooden pegs.

Most households had a vacuum cleaner and a cooker. Entertainment was pro-vided by the wireless or gramophone and more and more people were acquir-ing televisions. These were rented, not owned.  All television programmes were  in black and white and there was only one channel.

Clothes were often homemade, either sewn or knitted. Knitted items when out-grown were re-cycled by being unravelled and re-knitted into something else. When collars on shirts became frayed, they were unpicked, turned inside out and sewed back on. All buttons and zips from old clothes were saved and socks and stockings were darned.

Dinner would be on the table ready and waiting for the man of the house on his return from work. Housework and the care of children was considered wom-an’s work so the man would expect the house to be clean and tidy, meal ready, children fed and washed and his clothes all ready for the next day at work.

There was a succession of callers to the 1950s house. These would include the rag and bone man who would mend your pots and pans when the bottoms went through. There was also the ‘pop man’ from whom you would buy lemonade, dandelion and burdock. Alcoholic drinks could be bought from the off-licence, often part of the local pub; you would return the bottles in exchange for a few pence. The milk man came daily and delivered your milk to your doorstep. The local shops would also deliver your groceries, bread and meat, the delivery boys using bicycles to make their rounds. The dustbin men carried the metal dustbins on their backs from the  back door to the cart and back again.

For the 1950s housewife there was no need to go the gym; her day-to-day jobs kept her physically active. She walked to the shops and took the children to school every day on foot; the housework she did was very labour-intensive without gadgets and there were no convenience foods or fast food outlets. Sweets and plain crisps were treats rather than everyday foods.

The 1950s housewife had been prepared both at school and at home for her role in life; she took pleasure and pride in looking after her home and family to the best of her ability. However on the other side of the coin, she didn’t have a career outside the home and she had no income of her own, which left her de-pendent on her husband.

Best of times or worst of times? Bit of both it appears.

Keep in touch
Peter
gsseditor@gmail.com


On this day 8th  July 1960-1965

On 08/06/1960 the number one single was Cathy's Clown - Everly Broth-ers and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Sunday Night at the London Palladium (ATV) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Bing Crosby presented with a platinum disc by Hollywood Chamber of Commerce for estimated sales of 200 million records.

 On 08/07/1961 the number one single was Runaway - Del Shannon and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Labour Party Political Broadcast (all channels) and the box of-fice smash was One Hundred and One Dalmations. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to be-coming the Season's Division 1 champions.

 On 08/07/1962 the number one single was Come Outside - Mike Sarne with Wendy Richard and the number one album was West Side Story Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Lawrence of Arabia. A pound of today's money was worth £12.89 and Ipswich Town were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

 08/06/1963 the number one single was From Me To You - The Beatles and the number one album was Please Please Me - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Martin Luther King denounces JFK's civil rights policies.

On 08/07/1964 the number one single was House of the Rising Sun - Ani-mals and the number one album was Rolling Stones - The Rolling Stones. The top rated TV show was Room at the Top (ITV) and the box office smash was Dr Strangelove. A pound of today's money was worth £12.24 and Liverpool were on the way to becoming the Season's Division One champions

 On 08/07/1965 the number one single was I'm Alive - Hollies and the number one album was The Sound of Music Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.





Thursday, 29 June 2017

Web Page  No 2384

1st July 2017

Top Picture: Curtain behind the door
 Second Picture: Welfare Orange juice

 Third Picture: Interior of Ford 100E
Forth Picture: Omo advert






Growing up in the 1950s
Another set of 1950s memories that I have recently been sent, it will drag up some long forgotten things I suspect.
Everybody who grew up in Fifties Britain will have his or her own indelible memories of their childhood, from the first taste of welfare orange juice to the birth of rock' n’ roll. The nation was recovering from the ravages of the Second World War and the camaraderie of wartime was still evident throughout the country.
Despite the difficulties of day-to-day living people had great pride in and loyalty to their country and seemed to share a common purpose in life. Families stayed together through the hard times and everybody knew their neighbours and had a sense of belonging. They would routinely leave their door on the latch and hang a key on a piece of string behind the letterbox when they were out for their children to come and go as they pleased.
Children waking up on Christmas morning in 1952 had experienced rationing of food and clothes all of their lives. It was quite normal to go without the sweets, biscuits, crisps and fizzy drinks that would be taken for granted by future ­generations. Before sweet rationing ended in February 1953 the most prized thing in your Christmas stocking would have been a small, two-ounce bar of chocolate.
You probably didn’t get your first black and white television set until the late ­Fifties. After all, only three million British households had one by 1954, with numbers increasing to almost 13million by 1964.
But it didn’t matter if you had no television because you could play in the streets without the fear of traffic or the obstruction of parked cars. Buses and bicycles were the most popular modes of transport. In 1950 there were just under two million cars in Britain, with only 14% of households owning one. The most ­popular models in the Fifties included the Ford Prefect 100E and the Austin A35 saloon.
Many of us who grew up then have memories of houses that were draughty in winter with curtains hung behind the street door to reduce the flow of cold air and frost that formed overnight on the inside of bedroom windows.
The larger urban areas suffered with dense, yellowish smogs – known as pea-soupers – caused by fog combining with coal fire emissions. In 1952 a particularly thick smog shrouded London and caused the deaths of an estimated 12,000 people.
However, life was certainly not all doom and gloom. You grew up in a much safer environment than we can ever imagine these days. Children were able to enjoy the freedom of outdoor life. They played lots of rough-and-tumble games, got dirty and fell out of trees. The purple stains of iodine were always evident on the grazed knees of boys in short trousers.
There was no such thing as health and safety or children’s rights. We were taught discipline at home and at school and ­corporal punishment was administered for bad behaviour.
There was no mugging of old ladies and people felt that it was safe to walk the streets. There was very little vandalism and no graffiti. Telephone boxes were fully glazed and each contained a set of local telephone directories and a pay-box full of pennies.
Youngsters respected people in authority such as policemen, teachers, and park keepers, knowing that they would get a clip around the ear if they were caught misbehaving. Home life was much different from today. Everyone seemed to have a gramophone, an upright piano and a valve radio in their front room and there were ticking clocks all around the house.
The kitchen was filled with products such as Omo washing powder and Robin starch and a whistling kettle was a permanent fixture on the kitchen stove.
Most adults smoked and there were ashtrays in every room, even in the bedrooms. We still managed to eat lots of wholesome food, which was always freshly cooked, and mums seemed always to be ­baking and though many of us didn’t have a fridge and went shopping for ­groceries every day. Perishable foods were bought in small amounts – just enough to last a day. It was quite usual to buy a single item of fruit.
On Sundays everyone had a roast dinner and leftovers were made into stews and pies to eat later in the week. In 1950, 55% of young children drank tea with their meals. Bread and beef dripping was standard fare, that was even worse than the daily spoonful of cod liver oil many of us had to consume.
Boys and girls played street games together, such as run outs, hopscotch and British bulldog. In the playground schoolgirls practised handstands and cartwheels with their skirts tucked up under the elastic of their navy blue knickers, while the boys played conkers.
We travelled in third-class compartments on train journeys to the seaside and at the seaside you wore a knitted bathing costume on the beach.
Do you remember Pathé News at the cinema? Going to the pictures was everyone’s favourite outing, with all those wonderful stiff-upper-lip British film stars such as John Mills, Jack Hawkins, Kenneth More and Dirk Bogarde and great war films such as The Dam Busters, epics such as Ben-Hur and comedies such as The Belles Of St Trinian’s. When the film ended everyone stood for the National Anthem and stayed until it finished playing.
For children the Saturday morning pictures provided the best fun. Every week, 200 to 300 unruly children would descend on a cinema for a couple of hours of film and live entertainment. It was controlled mayhem with the stalls and circle filled with children cheering for the goodies and booing the baddies. It introduced us to The Lone Ranger and Zorro and the slapstick comedy of Mr Pastry and Buster Keaton.
Dusty, old-fashioned sweetshops had high wooden counters jam-packed with boxes of ha’penny chews and other sweet delights. Then there were those Smith’s potato crisps. The salt was in a twist of blue paper and you always had to rummage around for it at the bottom of the bag.
It was the decade of skiffle with Lonnie Donegan and of the start of rock' n’roll with Bill Haley, Elvis Presley and Cliff Richard. Cliff’s first hit Move It is credited as being the first rock'n’roll song produced outside the United States. While everyone now remembers rock'n’roll, in reality the record buyers were suckers for ­ballads and throughout the Fifties homegrown ballad singers had ­British girls swooning in the aisles .
It is hard to identify the Britain of today with how it was back then. The whole appearance of the country has changed, particularly in inner cities where so much building and development work has been done over the years. The war torn dilapidated houses, derelict land and bomb are now long gone.
There was something cosy about growing up in the last decade in which most children retained their childish innocence to the age of 12 or 13 and enjoyed a carefree life full of fun and games. The stresses of adolescence and then adult life could wait. We were lucky and we all managed to pass exams without the aid of Google!
Keep in touch
Peter


On this day 1st July 1960-1965

On 01/07/1960 the number one single was Three Steps to Heaven - Eddie Cochran and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was No Hiding Place (AR) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the week was Neale Fraser wins Wimbledon men's singles.

On 01/07/1961 the number one single was Runaway - Del Shannon and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Harpers West One (ATV) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmations. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the week was Author Ernest Hemingway commits suicide.

On 01/07/1962 the number one single was Come Outside - Mike Sarne with Wendy Richard and the number one album was West Side Story Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Lawrence of Arabia. A pound of today's money was worth £12.89 and Ipswich Town were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 01/07/1963 the number one single was I Like It - Gerry & the Pacemakers and the number one album was Please Please Me - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 01/07/1964 the number one single was It's Over - Roy Orbison and the number one album was Rolling Stones - The Rolling Stones. The top rated TV show was Club Night (BBC) and the box office smash was Dr Strangelove. A pound of today's money was worth £12.24 and Liverpool were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the week was President Johnson signs Civil Rights Act.


On 01/07/1965 the number one single was I'm Alive - Hollies and the number one album was The Sound of Music Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions

Thursday, 22 June 2017

Web Page  No 2382

24th June 2017

Top Picture: The Ronson Cadet
 Second Picture: The Queen Anne Table Lighter

Third Picture: The Ronson Butane Lighter
 Forth Picture: Ronson Lighter Fuel





Ronson Lighters

When we kids practically everybody’s father smoked and carried a lighter and you could almost guarantee that the lighter was a petrol Ronson. My father smoked and has a Ronson lighter in a little leather case in which he kept a silver threepenny piece to undo the screw on the bottom to refuel it.

The Ronson lighter company started as The Art Metal Works in 1897 and was incorporated on July 20, 1898, by Max Hecht, Louis V. Aronson and Leopold Herzig, in Newark, New Jersey.
Louis V. Aronson was a huge creative driving force for the company; and, with a few business adjustments, including the addition of Alexander Harris (1910-11) as Business Manager, the company soon became World Famous!
Louis Aronson was a gifted man, who at 16 years old set up a money-making shop in his parents' home - before receiving a U.S. patent for a commercially valuable metal-plating process he developed when he was just 24 years old. He sold half the rights while retaining the Right to Use and later used part of the proceeds to open the Art Metal Works in Newark, New Jersey. Soon the company was producing a variety of high-quality Lamps, book ends, art statues and other decorative items, things much prized today.

Aronson had established himself as a safety-match development pioneer with his inventions of the "Non-Toxic Match" and the "All-Weather Match" in the 1890s. Another invention was the wind-match, for which he applied for a patent in December 1896. He found a chemical combination which insured combustion in the highest wind, a boon to the tourist as well as to the explorer and the hunter. The patent was granted October 26, 1897 and a testimony to its merits is shown by a letter written by the former scientific chemist to the Royal Society of Great Britain in response to an inquiry of as to the chemical and commercial importance of the match:
In the investigations for improving this Windmatch, Aronson discovered the method for making a white phosphorus-free match. The Belgian government had offered a prize of 50,000 francs in a competition open to the world and this had stirred up scientists and chemists to redouble their efforts to produce such a match, and many came very near. The prize was, however, awarded to Mr. Aronson, he being judged the only one to produce an absolutely non-phosphorus match, and to have complied entirely with the conditions of the contest.
Ronson lighters
Whentechnological advances were developed to allow for the manufacture of a safe flint in 1906, Louis Aronson's ambition for an automatic pocket lighter soon became a reality. In 1913, he applied for a patent for a Liter (lighter), which was approved. In 1926 he released a new "automatic operation" Banjo lighter, which lit and extinguish in a single push. It was a great success, demand shortly exceeding supply, spurring Aronson to Patent it and design other products around the invention, which were marketed under the Ronson brand name. 
Under his leadership, the Art Metal Works began designing prototypes, and patented several generations of Igniting-Apparatus. Ronson received an exclusive patent, in 1926, for a new automatic lighter that worked with one hand, and in 1927 Ronson began marketed it as the Ronson De-Light Lighter with the slogan "A flip - and it's lit! Release - and it's out!" Ronson's new lighters were an overnight success worldwide and soon the company offered a variety of lighters for all tastes.
Looking like a long-barrel pistol, the Ronson Pisto-Lighter was shown at the 1912 Olympia (UK) car show on the Klaxon stand. It consisted of a file-like piece which was drawn up the barrel of the pistol against a strong spring, and when the trigger was pressed it was released rubbing against a 'flinty substance' contained in the cap where the front sight of the pistol would be. This action was said to produce a constellation of sparks sufficient to light an acetylene lamp in the wildest wind. At the time acetylene lighting was standard for motor vehicles.

In the early 1930s Art Metal Works, began to manufacture a new line of Touch-Tip table lighters which became hugely popular and many stylish Art Deco designs were produced.
After the war, Ronson turned to producing lighters, then branched out into domestic goods such as electric shavers and cooking appliances. The company expanded to include England and Australia.
In the early 1980s, high costs and the advent of cheap disposable lighters forced closure of its production facility at Leatherhead here in England. Now, a European branch at Long Buckby in Northamptonshire sells a range of lighters.
In February 2010, Zippo acquired certain assets of Ronson (lighters and lighter fluid products) in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Today, Ronson remains a strong brand in the U.S. and Canada. Ronson pocket lighters are available in both disposable and refillable versions. Several models of multi-purpose lighters and a touch-utility lighter are also marketed. Ronsonol lighter fluid and Multi-fill butane fuel have a sizable share of the market.
Ronson International Limited sells Ronson branded gift and everyday lighters, gas and fuel, and smoker's requisites internationally with the exception of Australia, Canada, Japan and USA. Ronson Internataional Limited headquarters are located in Northampton, England.
The best known lighter here in England and the one my father had was the Cadet. This silver coloured and durable square lighter was brought out to the public in 1959. It was made in three variants and they were made exclusively in England.


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Peter


On this day 25th June 1960-1965

On 24/06/1960 the number one single was Three Steps to Heaven - Eddie Cochran and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was No Hiding Place (AR) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 24/06/1961 the number one single was Surrender - Elvis Presley and the number one album was GI Blues - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was Harpers West One (ATV) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmations. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 24/06/1962 the number one single was Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley and the number one album was West Side Story Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Lawrence of Arabia. A pound of today's money was worth £12.89 and Ipswich Town were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 24/06/1963 the number one single was I Like It - Gerry & the Pacemakers and the number one album was Please Please Me - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 24/06/1964 the number one single was It's Over - Roy Orbison and the number one album was Rolling Stones - The Rolling Stones. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Dr Strangelove. A pound of today's money was worth £12.24 and Liverpool were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 24/06/1965 the number one single was I'm Alive - Hollies and the number one album was The Sound of Music Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.