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Thursday, 22 June 2017

Web Page  No 2382

24th June 2017

Top Picture: The Ronson Cadet
 Second Picture: The Queen Anne Table Lighter

Third Picture: The Ronson Butane Lighter
 Forth Picture: Ronson Lighter Fuel





Ronson Lighters

When we kids practically everybody’s father smoked and carried a lighter and you could almost guarantee that the lighter was a petrol Ronson. My father smoked and has a Ronson lighter in a little leather case in which he kept a silver threepenny piece to undo the screw on the bottom to refuel it.

The Ronson lighter company started as The Art Metal Works in 1897 and was incorporated on July 20, 1898, by Max Hecht, Louis V. Aronson and Leopold Herzig, in Newark, New Jersey.
Louis V. Aronson was a huge creative driving force for the company; and, with a few business adjustments, including the addition of Alexander Harris (1910-11) as Business Manager, the company soon became World Famous!
Louis Aronson was a gifted man, who at 16 years old set up a money-making shop in his parents' home - before receiving a U.S. patent for a commercially valuable metal-plating process he developed when he was just 24 years old. He sold half the rights while retaining the Right to Use and later used part of the proceeds to open the Art Metal Works in Newark, New Jersey. Soon the company was producing a variety of high-quality Lamps, book ends, art statues and other decorative items, things much prized today.

Aronson had established himself as a safety-match development pioneer with his inventions of the "Non-Toxic Match" and the "All-Weather Match" in the 1890s. Another invention was the wind-match, for which he applied for a patent in December 1896. He found a chemical combination which insured combustion in the highest wind, a boon to the tourist as well as to the explorer and the hunter. The patent was granted October 26, 1897 and a testimony to its merits is shown by a letter written by the former scientific chemist to the Royal Society of Great Britain in response to an inquiry of as to the chemical and commercial importance of the match:
In the investigations for improving this Windmatch, Aronson discovered the method for making a white phosphorus-free match. The Belgian government had offered a prize of 50,000 francs in a competition open to the world and this had stirred up scientists and chemists to redouble their efforts to produce such a match, and many came very near. The prize was, however, awarded to Mr. Aronson, he being judged the only one to produce an absolutely non-phosphorus match, and to have complied entirely with the conditions of the contest.
Ronson lighters
Whentechnological advances were developed to allow for the manufacture of a safe flint in 1906, Louis Aronson's ambition for an automatic pocket lighter soon became a reality. In 1913, he applied for a patent for a Liter (lighter), which was approved. In 1926 he released a new "automatic operation" Banjo lighter, which lit and extinguish in a single push. It was a great success, demand shortly exceeding supply, spurring Aronson to Patent it and design other products around the invention, which were marketed under the Ronson brand name. 
Under his leadership, the Art Metal Works began designing prototypes, and patented several generations of Igniting-Apparatus. Ronson received an exclusive patent, in 1926, for a new automatic lighter that worked with one hand, and in 1927 Ronson began marketed it as the Ronson De-Light Lighter with the slogan "A flip - and it's lit! Release - and it's out!" Ronson's new lighters were an overnight success worldwide and soon the company offered a variety of lighters for all tastes.
Looking like a long-barrel pistol, the Ronson Pisto-Lighter was shown at the 1912 Olympia (UK) car show on the Klaxon stand. It consisted of a file-like piece which was drawn up the barrel of the pistol against a strong spring, and when the trigger was pressed it was released rubbing against a 'flinty substance' contained in the cap where the front sight of the pistol would be. This action was said to produce a constellation of sparks sufficient to light an acetylene lamp in the wildest wind. At the time acetylene lighting was standard for motor vehicles.

In the early 1930s Art Metal Works, began to manufacture a new line of Touch-Tip table lighters which became hugely popular and many stylish Art Deco designs were produced.
After the war, Ronson turned to producing lighters, then branched out into domestic goods such as electric shavers and cooking appliances. The company expanded to include England and Australia.
In the early 1980s, high costs and the advent of cheap disposable lighters forced closure of its production facility at Leatherhead here in England. Now, a European branch at Long Buckby in Northamptonshire sells a range of lighters.
In February 2010, Zippo acquired certain assets of Ronson (lighters and lighter fluid products) in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Today, Ronson remains a strong brand in the U.S. and Canada. Ronson pocket lighters are available in both disposable and refillable versions. Several models of multi-purpose lighters and a touch-utility lighter are also marketed. Ronsonol lighter fluid and Multi-fill butane fuel have a sizable share of the market.
Ronson International Limited sells Ronson branded gift and everyday lighters, gas and fuel, and smoker's requisites internationally with the exception of Australia, Canada, Japan and USA. Ronson Internataional Limited headquarters are located in Northampton, England.
The best known lighter here in England and the one my father had was the Cadet. This silver coloured and durable square lighter was brought out to the public in 1959. It was made in three variants and they were made exclusively in England.


Keep in touch
Peter


On this day 25th June 1960-1965

On 24/06/1960 the number one single was Three Steps to Heaven - Eddie Cochran and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was No Hiding Place (AR) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 24/06/1961 the number one single was Surrender - Elvis Presley and the number one album was GI Blues - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was Harpers West One (ATV) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmations. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 24/06/1962 the number one single was Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley and the number one album was West Side Story Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Lawrence of Arabia. A pound of today's money was worth £12.89 and Ipswich Town were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 24/06/1963 the number one single was I Like It - Gerry & the Pacemakers and the number one album was Please Please Me - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 24/06/1964 the number one single was It's Over - Roy Orbison and the number one album was Rolling Stones - The Rolling Stones. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Dr Strangelove. A pound of today's money was worth £12.24 and Liverpool were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 24/06/1965 the number one single was I'm Alive - Hollies and the number one album was The Sound of Music Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.


Thursday, 15 June 2017

Web Page  No 2380

17th June 2017

Top Picture: Jewel and Warriss
 Second Picture: Nearest and Dearest

Third Picture: Ben Warriss Grave
 Forth Picture: Nearest and Dearest film poster






Jimmy Jewel and Ben Warriss

For most of our younger lives and into the 1980s the comedy team everyone looked up to was Morecombe and Wise but before them there was another double act Jewel and Warriss.

Jewel and Warriss were first cousins and were brought up in the same household, even being born in the same bed (a few months apart) at 52 Andover Street, Sheffield. Jimmy Jewel worked as a solo act until 1934, when he formed an enduring double act with Ben Warriss initially at the Palace Theatre, Newcastle upon Tyne. They toured  Australia and America, as well as appearing in the 1946 Royal Variety Performance and five  pantomimes for Howard & Wyndham Ltd at the Opera House, Blackpool.

A major success of their partnership was the very popular BBC radio series Up the Pole which began in October 1947. The premise of Up the Pole was that Jewel and Warriss were the proprietors of an Arctic trading post. Each episode included a musical interlude, and this sometimes featured the young Julie Andrews.

The pair were top of the bill in two London Palladium shows - Gangway (1942) and High Time (1946) and went on to make regular television appearances in the 1950s and 60s. The duo also had the lead roles in the short-lived 1962 comedy series It's a Living.

Ben Holden Driver Warriss  was born on 29th May 1909, he was the son of Benjamin Holden Joseph Warriss, an insurance company inspector and his wife, Mary Ann, née Driver, Jimmy Jewel's mother's sister. He first performed on the stage in 1930. Their double act achieved seven Royal Variety Performances and 12 Blackpool summer seasons. Around 1966, the two went their separate ways, with Ben Warriss performing on stage and Jewel moving into television.

In the 1970s Ben Warriss was the resident compere at the Cala Gran club in Fleetwood.. In 1988 he played the Emperor of China in the first of the newly reopened Hackney Empire pantomimes, Aladdin. He was still performing in pantomime in his eighties. The character Parker from the 1960s TV series of Thunderbirds is said to have been based upon his appearance.

His first wife, whom he married on 22nd September 1934, was Grace Mary Skinner a dancer and teacher of dancing and daughter of a master mariner. This marriage had ended by 1940 and two years later Ben Warriss married the entertainer Meggie Easton. His third marriage, which took place about 1960, was to Virginia Vernon. He died in 1993 at Brinsworth House, Staines Road, Twickenham, and is buried in the same section of Streatham Park Cemetery, London, as comedian Will Hay
.
James Arthur Thomas Jewel Marsh, known as Jimmy Jewel, was born on 4th December 1909. He was the son of a comedian and actor who also used the stage name Jimmy Jewel, the young Jimmy made his stage debut in Robinson Crusoe in Barnsley, at the age of four, performed with his father from the age of 10 and subsequently became stage manager for the family show.

When young Jimmy started his own act, his father refused to let him use his stage name 'Jimmy Jewel', so he performed as Maurice Marsh. He made his first London stage appearance at the Bedford Music Hall, Camden Town in 1925.

After splitting from Ben Warriss in 1966, and having done a stint working as joiner and bricklayer, He appeared in a Comedy Playhouse and two ITV Playhouse productions. He also played a murderous quick-change vaudeville artist in a 1968 episode of The Avengers. He then starred in the sitcom Nearest and Dearest with Hylda Baker as bickering brother and sister pickle factory owners Eli and Nellie Pledge from 1968 to 1973, including a film version of the series in 1972. Although their characters hurled insults at each other onscreen, the insults would continue offscreen as well as the two actors allegedly detested each other. (An ex girlfriend of mine actually had a very minor part in this film, she played Scarlett O’Hara and had three words to say ‘Yes Miss Pledge’).

While Nearest and Dearest was running, he had a regular role in the short-lived 1969 sitcom Thicker than Water and made an appearance in the 1970 film The Man Who Had Power Over Women. He also starred in the comedy series Spring and Autumn (1972–76) as retired railway worker Tommy Butler. In the early 1980s, he made appearances in Worzel Gummidge and two Play For Today episodes. In 1981 he starred in Funny Man a series about a family music hall act, on his father's company in the 1920s and 1930s. In the 1990s, then in his 80s, he continued to make appearances in film and television. He was married to Belle Bluett with whom he had a son and an adopted daughter. In 1985 He won a Variety Club of Great Britain Special Award. He died on 3rd December 1995, the day before his 86th birthday, and was cremated and interred at the Golders Green Crematorium, in London.

I remember being taken to see them at Southsea Pier when I was a nipper, they were second on the bill, Arthur English was top.

Keep in touch
Peter

On this day 17th June 1960-1965

On this day 17th June 1960-1965
On 17/06/1960 the number one single was Cathy's Clown - Everly Brothers and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Sunday Night at the London Palladium (ATV) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 17/06/1961 the number one single was Surrender - Elvis Presley and the number one album was GI Blues - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was Probation Officer (ATV) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmations. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 17/06/1961 the number one single was Surrender - Elvis Presley and the number one album was GI Blues - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was Probation Officer (ATV) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmations. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 17/06/1962 the number one single was Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley and the number one album was Blue Hawaii - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Lawrence of Arabia. A pound of today's money was worth £12.89 and Ipswich Town were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Brazil wins World Cup Final.

On 17/06/1963 the number one single was From Me To You - The Beatles and the number one album was Please Please Me - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was Conservative Party Political Broadcast (all channels) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Prince Charles (14) buys cherry brandy.
On 17/06/1964 the number one single was You're My World - Cilla Black and the number one album was Rolling Stones - The Rolling Stones. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Dr Strangelove. A pound of today's money was worth £12.24 and Liverpool were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 17/06/1965 the number one single was Crying in the Chapel - Elvis Presley and the number one album was The Sound of Music Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.




Friday, 9 June 2017

Web Page  No 2378
10th June 2017

Top Picture: The Half Penny and Farthing

Second Picture: A Bun Penny





Third Picture: A Florin



Forth Picture: A White Fiver






Money

When we were kids there seemed to be far more money about. I do not mean amounts but physically as in coins and notes of the Realm. If and when we started to receive pocket money a shilling seemed a fortune and a half crown was more money than we could of dreamt about. How many hours did we spend in learning how many pence to a shilling or half a crown or even a pound, no wonder foreign visitors became confused

The smallest denomination coin we had was, of course, the farthing (¼d) , from "fourthing", one quarter of a penny, or one nine hundred and sixtieth of a pound. Minted in bronze it replaced copper farthings and was used during the reign of six monarchs: Victoria, Edward VII, George V, Edward VIII, George VI and Elizabeth II, ceasing to be legal tender in 1960. It featured two different designs on its reverse during its  years in circulation from Britannia  and from 1937 onwards a wren. Like all British coinage, it bore the portrait of the monarch on the obverse.

The halfpenny (½d) was 1/480th of a pound. Like the fathing it was originally minted in copper, but after 1860 in bronze. It ceased to be legal tender in 1969, in the run-up to decimalisation. The halfpenny featured two different designs on its reverse during its years in circulation. From 1672 until 1936 the image of Britannia appeared on the reverse, and from 1937 onwards the image of the Golden Hind. 

The Penny; Its symbol was d, from the Roman denarius. It was a continuation of the earlier English Penny. The penny was originally minted in silver, but from the late 18th century it was minted in copper and then after 1860 in bronze. This nickel brass version of the penny was made obsolete in 1971 by decimalisation, and was replaced by the decimal penny that we see today. When we handle an old penny today we wonder at the size and weight of them. One way of children saving was to collect ‘Bun Pennies’, ie penny coins with a portrait of Queen Victoria wearing her hair in a bun. They became increasingly rare as they were started to be withdrawn because of wear. 

From here on we progressed into silver coins. The sixpence (6d) the tanner or sixpenny bit, was worth 1/40th of a pound. It was first minted in the reign of Edward VI and circulated until 1980. Following decimalisation in 1971 it had a value of  2 12 new pence. The coin was made from silver from its introduction in 1551 to 1947, and thereafter in cupronickel.

The British two shilling coin, also known as the "two bob bit", was issued from 1849 until 1967. It was worth twenty-four old pence. In 1968, in the run-up to decimalisation, the two shilling coin was superseded by the decimal ten pence coin, which had the same value and initially the same size and weight. It continued in circulation, alongside the ten pence coin, until 1992, when the 10p was reduced in size.

The Florin: Except for the short period during the reign of Edward III when a gold florin was struck by the Royal Mint, the florin did not feature as part of the British coinage until 1849. It was introduced as a concession to enthusiasts for a decimal system of coinage, being one-tenth of a pound in value. It owed its name not to any resemblance in shape or value to the gold florins but to the fact that it was about the same size as Dutch and Austrian florins current at that time. Its first issue aroused public indignation owing to the omission of the words DEI GRATIA and FIDEI DEFENSOR from Queen Victoria’s titles, the coin thereby commonly being known as the Godless or Graceless florin. This omission was soon corrected and the florin proved to be a useful addition to the silver circulation, if sometimes troublesome because of its close similarity in size to the half-crown.
The goal when we were kids and trying to save was to get as many half crowns in your money box as possible. A half crown was equivalent to two shillings and sixpence, or one-eighth of a pound. The half crown was first issued in 1549, in the reign of Edward VI. No half crowns were issued in the reign of Mary, but from the reign of Elizabeth I half crowns were issued in every reign except Edward VIII, until the coins were discontinued in 1967. The half crown was demonetised (ahead of other pre-decimal coins) on 1 January 1970.
Well there we go a quick look at the coins we all used to have in our pockets. Maybe another time I will look at 10/-, £1, £5 (including white fivers) and the £10 notes. One thing I remember from my childhood is receiving, as presents, Postal Orders, but that is an entirely different subject.

 Keep in touch
Peter

On this day 10th June 1960-1965

On 10/06/1960 the number one single was Cathy's Clown - Everly Brothers and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Sunday Night at the London Palladium (ATV) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 10/06/1961 the number one single was Surrender - Elvis Presley and the number one album was GI Blues - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was No Hiding Place (AR) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmations. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 10/06/1962 the number one single was Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley and the number one album was Blue Hawaii - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Lawrence of Arabia. A pound of today's money was worth £12.89 and Ipswich Town were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was England lose World Cup Quarter Final 3-1 to Brazil.

On 10/06/1963 the number one single was From Me To You - The Beatles and the number one album was Please Please Me - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions. The big news story of the day was Buddhist monk burns himself alive as protest.

On 10/06/1964 the number one single was You're My World - Cilla Black and the number one album was Rolling Stones - The Rolling Stones. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Dr Strangelove. A pound of today's money was worth £12.24 and Liverpool were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.The big news story of the day was 1st World Book Fair in London

On 10/06/1965 the number one single was Long Live Love - Sandie Shaw and the number one album was The Sound of Music Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.The big news story of the day was 750th anniversary of Magna Carta.






Friday, 2 June 2017

Web Page  No 2376
3rd June 2017

Top Picture: Show Biz Eleven


Second Picture: The TV All Stars Football Club. Back Row: Bernie Winters, Jess Conrad, Pete Murray, Larry Taylor, Ray Merrill and Peter Thompson. Front Row: Unknown, Leslie Wise, Unknown, Mike Winters, Unknown, Tommy Steele.




Third Picture: The Modern Team


The Showbiz XI

For half a century, celebrities have risked making fools of themselves with no need for reality TV, by playing football all in a good cause

The lure of the football pitch for theatre folk has always been strong. Ever since football became a mass attraction, variety artists have been attached to the game. Before the First World War, George Robey, “The Prime Minister of Mirth”, organised charity fund-­raising matches involving top football stars and music-hall favourites, which drew large crowds. After the war, the tradition continued with teams representing actors, the cinema, pantomime artists, dance bands and the pioneering women’s team, Dick Kerr’s Ladies.
By the 1950s, with variety dying, the only regular such fixture was a Boxers v Jockeys match raising funds for sportsmen’s charities. But entertainment was being  transformed by  television and rock’n’roll and  in 1957this ­produced ­a charity football ­phenomenon – the Showbiz XI. 
Started in a coffee bar in Soho by disc jockey and song plugger Jimmy Henney and Cliff Richard’s manager, Franklyn Boyd, it was primarily an outlet for young musicians and actors to indulge themselves in a game that many of them might well have taken up professionally in different circumstances. Early line-ups included Sean Connery, Tommy Steele, Jimmy Tarbuck, Tony Newley, Lonnie Donegan, Des O’Connor and Patrick McGoohan, who was a rugged centre-half, plus various theatrical agents, managers and hangers-on. Although the team often trained at Highbury, ex-professional players featured rarely: only Billy Wright and Wally Barnes, a former Arsenal wing-half then working as a commentator, were ever-present.


Current pros were banned, of course. Stanley Matthews was reprimanded by the FA for appearing in a fund-raiser between the Tennis Stars and a Showbiz XI in December 1960 because the Showbiz team was “unaffiliated”. He was forced to give a written undertaking not to do it again.



One among the pioneers was Jess Conrad, unlike Tommy Steele, Sean Connery and many of the others, he boasted no athletic ability whatsoever. But he had a dream. “I went in goal because, when I was younger, a Russian ­goalkeeper, Lev Yashin, caught my imagination. The pictures of him were so reminiscent of Batman sweeping through the air, and he was dressed all in black.” The fact that he couldn’t kick a ball mattered little. For the next 40 years, Jess would earn quite a reputation as a shot-stopper, diving and risking his heavily insured teeth at the same time. He would ultimately captain, manage and organise the Showbiz XI. He also designed the logos, sourced the sponsors, negotiated with the FA, and packed the hampers as the various teams travelled to the four corners of the UK and beyond. When he was making movies, it was written into his contract that, every Saturday, wherever he was, he would be flown back to London to play.



He kept a record of every match and every score because they were deadly serious when it came to the result. He explained: “They wouldn’t have played if they hadn’t thought they were any good, they just wouldn’t have exposed themselves. We tried comedy football, which was a disaster, throwing buckets of water over people, silly hats, but people never ever came to see that, what they came to see was a football match at reasonable standard.”



They turned up in their thousands. In May 1957,  Alma Cogan kicked off a Showbiz XI game at West Ham in front of 23,000, while crowds often reached 30,000. Games were so popular that a “lighter” rival, the TV All-Stars, appeared. Mike and Bernie Winters picked teams featuring stars created by  ITV shows such as The Army Game, Emergency Ward 10 and Sunday Night At The London Palladium. Their matches would often feature slapstick silliness, which turned off some of the more traditionalist players.



When professional players led by Jimmy Hill were threatening to strike in 1961, the players’ union planned strike fund-raising matches. The Showbiz XI felt the cause was too political and declined to help, but the All-Stars obliged. George Eastham played alongside Mike and Bernie Winters, incurring the wrath of the FA.


The list of causes supported years is endless, from the Aberfan disaster to the Bradford Fire, Hillsborough to Dunblane, local hospices and special schools, Save The Valley, the Wishing Well Appeal, community centres. The roll-call of players includes Ray and Dave Davies of the Kinks, David Frost, Nicky Campbell, Rod Stewart, Roy Castle, Freddie Starr, Dennis Waterman, Ray Winstone and Robbie Williams, and ex-players such as Vinnie Jones and Paul Gascoigne.


Injury forced Jess Conrad to quit in the 1980s. He bemoans the changes that have occurred saying “We came into the business as young, ordinary guys, and felt we had to give something back. Younger performers today want money and proper expenses. It’s more of a business, but there are bigger sponsors and it’s better publicised so we make more money.”



Cliff Richard apparently sacked Franklyn Boyd because he was always somewhere else with the Showbiz team. And Larry Parnes, Tommy Steele’s manager back in 1961, told him in no uncertain terms that, having just landed a starring role in a West End pantomime, he wasn’t to play football. Tommy goes off, plays – and breaks his leg. No way can he tell Parnes, so he gets smuggled into the theatre, makes his first entrance down the stairs from his dressing room – and pretends to fall down and break his leg. The understudy had to go on and Larry Parnes never learned the truth.”



Today, Jess Conrad is the Showbiz XI president and confines his role to introducing the team before the game.


Keep in touch

Peter


On this day 3rd June 1960-1965

On 03/06/1960 the number one single was Cathy's Clown - Everly Brothers and the number one album was South Pacific Soundtrack. The top rated TV show was Wagon Train (ITV) and the box office smash was Psycho. A pound of today's money was worth £13.68 and Burnley were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 03/06/1961 the number one single was Surrender - Elvis Presley and the number one album was GI Blues - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was No Hiding Place (AR) and the box office smash was One Hundred and One Dalmations. A pound of today's money was worth £13.25 and Tottenham Hotspur were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 03/06/1962 the number one single was Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley and the number one album was Blue Hawaii - Elvis Presley. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was Lawrence of Arabia. A pound of today's money was worth £12.89 and Ipswich Town were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 03/06/1963 the number one single was From Me To You - The Beatles and the number one album was Please Please Me - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 03/06/1963 the number one single was From Me To You - The Beatles and the number one album was Please Please Me - The Beatles. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Great Escape. A pound of today's money was worth £12.64 and Everton were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.

On 03/06/1965 the number one single was Long Live Love - Sandie Shaw and the number one album was Bringing It All Back Home - Bob Dylan. The top rated TV show was Coronation Street (Granada) and the box office smash was The Sound of Music. A pound of today's money was worth £11.69 and Manchester United were on the way to becoming the Season's Division 1 champions.